7.03.2007

Lavinia

Is anyone else familiar with the story of Titus Andronicus? Shakespeare did a version of it, though the plot itself is much older than Shakespeare. At the risk of being melodramatic, I wonder if anyone else has perceived the ordination process as a Lavinia period? A time when we are attacked in some ways, and at the same time rendered mute?

People are misinformed, I suspect because we play Ecclesiastical Telephone. Unlike Lavinia's losses, I don't think that an aspirant's/postulant's/candidate's muteness comes into being through vindictiveness. It's still hurtful, still damaging. When does clarity finally trump deference? When can one say, "I'm sorry, sir, I don't believe that's quite accurate?" When can the Bottom of the Ladder approach the Busy Important Man?

I'm very lucky-- the top of our ladder is a kind, caring person. Unfortunately, we see each other largely through the lenses of the middle rungs, and they seem very hazy to me at this point.

This is not a system that fosters clarity.

5 comments:

  1. This post makes me happy I've decided to put my own process on the back burner for now. Prayers for you during this time of uncertainty.

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  2. Hmmmm...you oughtta visit the current poetry discussion at Seeking Authentic Voice.

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  3. Prayers fo r you as you continue to navigate this process.

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  4. Mrs. M, I love you. You will make it through this because you are a strong woman and you are called to this work, no matter how hard it is to actually get to the work. The hard part is deciding if now is the time to speak up or if now is the time to be patient. There are historical and literary models for both. Which ever path you choose will be the right one.

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  5. I don't know the ancient story but the current story of ordination process sounds all too familiar.

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"So keep fightin' for freedom and justice, beloveds, but don't you forget to have fun doin' it. Lord, let your laughter ring forth. Be outrageous, ridicule the fraidy-cats, rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce. And when you get through kickin' ass and celebratin' the sheer joy of a good fight, be sure to tell those who come after how much fun it was."
-Saint Molly Ivins